Born in Peoria- Daniel Dugdale- “Father of Seattle Baseball”

Born in Peoria- Daniel Dugdale-  “Father of Seattle Baseball”

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO SHARE!

Central Illinois has had many major league baseball players in history. Let’s look at them from the 12 counties that we have selected to become Central Illinois. (Logan, McLean, DeWitt, Knox, Woodford, Fulton, Peoria, Mason, Tazewell, Cass, Morgan, Sangamon)

Daniel Dugdale “Father of Seattle Baseball”

Major League Debut May 20, 1886

 

   Dugdale was born in Peoria, Illinois, on October 28, 1864, to Irish immigrants (they are on this ships list of passengers coming to the United States) Edward Dugdale and Rebecca Lyons. His youth is not documented until he begins playing baseball. In 1884, he signs as a catcher for the Peoria Reds of the Northwestern League. From there, he lays on a multitude of teams (Hannibal, Leavenworth, Keokuk, and Denver) in the Midwest League. It was in 1886, he signs a major league contract with the Kansas City Cowboys in the National League. In his debut, he collected two hits as the Cowboys won 5-4 despite three passed balls from “Dug”.

 

 

His defense behind the plate wasn’t very good and he converted to third base and the outfield. But at 5’8″ and 180 lbs., he had trouble moving around the field. It was his bat that kept him employed. He was able to stick around the game through the 1895 season. He was a back-up player and that gave him a reason to leave. He was also unhappy with the sportswriters talking about his weight which had ballooned to almost 300 lbs. He left the major leagues and return to his hometown in Peoria.

Back home, he purchased a share of the Peoria Distillers and became their manager and they finished second in his first year. He spent some time in Minneapolis in the off-season but returned to Peoria to manage again. The Distillers did poorly and Dugdale decided to move west and follow the gold where he was part of the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush. His move to Alaska stopped in Seattle and he took a job as a brakeman for the railroad. While there, he made several attempts to begin a baseball team in Seattle.

By 1902, he was deeply entrenched in Seattle baseball and got a team in the Pacific Coast League. He became a celebrity and a successful baseball owner. He funded the construction of Yesler Way Park in 1907 and became friends with Connie Mack. This got him into the door of the major league ownership group. Things were moving and it wasn’t long before Seattle had a major league franchise. This was all due to the work and money of Daniel Dugdale. Those efforts afforded him the title of “The Father of Seattle Baseball.

 

 

 

 

 

He got involved in politics and was appointed to the Washington Legislature in the 34th District from the Democratic Party. His wife Mary died in 1933 and he moved in with his sister for a short period of time prior to his death.

On March 9, 1934, he was crossing the street on Fourth Avenue South in Seattle when he was hit by a city light truck and died at Providence Hospital three hours later. He was 69 years of age at his death.

 

For more information, check out the Society of Baseball Research information on Dugdale.

 

Other Central Illinois Bios:

Allyn Stout (Peoria)   Larry Simpson (Springfield)  Fred Beck (Havana)  Carl Vandagrift (Cantrall)

Emmett Seery (Princeville)

 

 

Bios Coming:

George Radbourn (Bloomington)

Eric Weaver (Springfield)

Daniel Dugdale (Peoria)

Billy Rogell (Springfield)

Harry Staley (Jacksonville)

 

 

Central Illinois Major League Debut- Eric Weaver (Springfield)

Central Illinois Major League Debut- Eric Weaver (Springfield)

Central Illinois has had many major league baseball players in history. Let’s look at them from the 12 counties that we have selected to become Central Illinois. (Logan, McLean, DeWitt, Woodford, Fulton, Peoria, Mason, Tazewell, Cass, Morgan, Menard, Sangamon)

Previous Articles:

Allyn Stout (Peoria)

Allan Simpson (Springfield)

Fred Beck (Havana)

Carl Vandagrift (Cantrall)

 

Eric Weaver

Major League Debut May 30, 1998

 

James Eric Weaver was born August 4, 1973, in Springfield, Illinois. He attended Illiopolis High School where he excelled in athletics. In basketball, he averaged 35 points per game and 22 rebounds in his senior season. He was the quarterback of the Illiopolis Pirates and many feel he was the best all-around athlete in their high school history. He turned down a baseball scholarship from Bradley University and went to the minor leagues for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

He began his minor league career in Vero Beach, Florida at age 18 and after several seasons in the minor leagues, Weaver was called up and made his major league debut for the Dodgers on May 30, 1998. He pitched 3.1 innings in that game he replaced Hideki Nomo and allowed 3 hits, one walk, and one strikeout before giving way. Dmitri Young was his first struck of the game in the 5th inning. Also, in the 7th inning, Young hit a solo home run off of Weaver.  Game Box Score Here.

In seven games during the 1998 season, he finished with a 2-0 record. On October 12, 1998, he was traded by the Los Angeles Dodgers to the Seattle Mariners for Scott Prouty (minors). He went 0-1 for Seattle in eight games and a high ERA. He signed with the Angels for the 2000 season. He was in 17 games and finished 0-2 with no saves. His last game in the major leagues came on August 17, 2000. He was granted his free agency after the season.

Weaver has left professional baseball and spent many years as the pitching coach for Lincoln Land College and then moved to coach his son and teammates at Auburn High School in pitching. Last known information has Eric Weaver working for the Bank of Springfield.

 

Central Illinois Major League Debuts- George Radbourn (Bloomington)

Central Illinois Major League Debuts- George Radbourn (Bloomington)

Central Illinois has had many major league baseball players in history. Let’s look at them from the 12 counties that we have selected to become Central Illinois. (Logan, McLean, DeWitt, Woodford, Fulton, Peoria, Mason, Tazewell, Cass, Morgan, Menard, Sangamon).

Check out previous Central Illinois Debuts

 

 

George Radbourn

Major League Debut May 30, 1883

 

George B. Radbourn was born on April 8, 1856, in Bloomington, Illinois to George and Emily Radbourn. The family left Bristol, England in the summer of 1851 along with George’s brothers James and Charles and his wife Caroline. They came on the ship Mary Ann Peter and arrived on August 22, 1851. This was several years before George was born.

They took up residence in Rochester, New York until the entire family group moved to McLean County, Illinois in 1855. George and Emily located in Bloomington, Illinois, and Charles and Caroline and their newborn son Charles (later became Old Hoss Radbourn) were in Martin, Illinois. The family soon bought a farm on West Washington Road near Bloomington when George was born in 1856.

George began to play baseball with his cousin Charles. In 1883, George made his debut with the Detroit Wolverines and played in 3 career games and finished with a 1-2 record and a 6.55ERA. Little is written about the years after baseball.

His cousin Charles would go on to a long and illustrious baseball career. George moved back to Bloomington and died on January 1, 1904. He is buried in Bloomington at the Evergreen Memorial Cemetery.

 

There is a children’s book called, “How George Radbourn Saved Baseball” that has nothing to do with the actual player. It is a highly illustrated book and has the use of his name in the title.

 

Central Illinois Major League Debuts- Emmett Seery (Princeville)

Central Illinois Major League Debuts- Emmett Seery (Princeville)

Central Illinois has had many major league baseball players in history. Let’s look at them from the 12 counties that we have selected to become Central Illinois. (Logan, McLean, DeWitt, Woodford, Fulton, Peoria, Mason, Tazewell, Cass, Morgan, Menard, Sangamon)

Previous Articles:

Allyn Stout (Peoria)

Allan Simpson (Springfield)

Fred Beck (Havana)

Emmett Seery

Major League Debut on April 17, 1884

 

He was born John Emmett Seery on February 13, 1861, in Princeville, Illinois. From there, little is known of his life until he started playing baseball. He began playing in a semi-pro ball in Waltham, MA and then became a professional for the Baltimore Monumentals in 1884 where he hit .313 and was included in the top five of many statistical categories.

The next season saw him head to Kansas City and play for the Cowboys. He was a league leader again with nine triples and 43 runs scored. He pitched some games for them that year. In 1886, he rostered with the St. Louis Maroons for one year where he hit only .159 and was the subject of ridicule from some of his teammates. His main antagonist was Charlie Sweeney who was a known guzzler of whiskey.

Seery and Sweeney got into a huge fight in the dugout with many siding with Seery, even though Seery was 5’7″ and 145 pounds.  Later on during the season, Sweeney was walking down the street in St. Louis late at night and a band of thugs beat him an inch from his life. Many felt Seery hired the guys to beat him up.

He then played for several more teams which included Indianapolis Hoosiers, Brooklyn Ward’s Wonders, Cincinnati Kelly’s Killers, and Louisville Colonels from 1884 to 1892. In 916 career Major League games, Seery batted .252 with 893 hits.

Seery made his last professional appearance on June 12, 1892, for the Louisville Colonels.

After Baseball

Seery retired to Florida and began an orange grove which became very profitable. He died on August 7, 1930, and is buried in Jensen Beach, Florida.

 

« Previous Entries Next Entries »